Titan aka the Mermaid Moon

(via littlegreywitch)

Death acts as a reminder to us of the transient nature of life. Every moment is precious and every living thing sacred.

Mark Ryan and John Matthews, The Wild Wood Tarot  (via elige)

(via elige)

Earthlight

Earthlight is the partial illumination of the dark portion of the moon’s surface by light reflected from the Earth and from the Earth’s airglow. It is also known as Earthshine [or] Planetshine, the Moon’s ashen glow, or the old Moon in the new Moon’s arms.”

(via rrobbed)

I survived because the fire inside me burned brighter than the fire around me.

Joshua Graham  (via elige)

(via elige)

When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

Ann Druyan (via whats-out-there)

(via megacosms)

The universe is wider than our views of it.

Henry David Thoreau, d. 1862 (via we-are-star-stuff)

(via observedintoexistence)

I would love to believe that when I die I will live again, that some thinking, feeling, remembering part of me will continue. But much as I want to believe that, and despite the ancient and worldwide cultural traditions that assert an afterlife, I know of nothing to suggest that it is more than wishful thinking. The world is so exquisite with so much love and moral depth, that there is no reason to deceive ourselves with pretty stories for which there’s little good evidence. Far better it seems to me, in our vulnerability, is to look death in the eye and to be grateful every day for the brief but magnificent opportunity that life provides.

Carl Sagan (via brainflush)

(via sociolab)

The separation between past, present, and future is only an illusion.

Existence is a flame which constantly melts and recasts our theories. Existential thinking offers no security, no home for the homeless. It addresses no one except for you and me. It finds its validation when, across the gulf of our idioms and styles, our mistakes, errings and perversities, we find in the other’s communication an experience of relationship established, lost, destroyed, or regained. We hope to share the experience of a relationship, but the only honest beginning, or even end, may be to share the experience of its absence.

R.D. Laing, The Politics of Experience (1967). (via emanationsoftheyellowsign)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

The great object of life is sensation—to feel that we exist, even though in pain.

George Gordon Byron  (via elige)

(via elige)